The DIG Collective | Snout in Souliloquy
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  • Black and white photo of a woman facing camera with an expressionless face. She is wearing a black jacket and has "I will not be lectured" written across her chest and "Ditch the witch" on her cheek.
  • Black and white photo of a woman facing camera with an expressionless face. Side on close up of her cheek "A long time coming" on her cheek.
  • Black and white photo of a woman facing camera with her chin resting on her hand, smiling at the camera
  • Black and white photo of a woman facing camera with an expressionless face. Side on close up of her cheek "Ditch the witch" on her cheek.

Snout in Souliloquy

Snout in Souliloquy is a collaboration with V&T (Victorine Pontillon and Tilly Lunken) that explores new writing in response to the 400-year anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death.

 

While many theatre companies chose to present shakespeare’s classic plays during this year-long celebration, V&T produced a series of new works that gave time to some of Shakespeare’s non-central characters. Their aim was to “focus on those who lack agency in the original texts and enter into a dialogue with the plays.”

 

The DIG Collective was invited to interpret and perform a text based on the character of Snout from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The text pays homage to Shakespearian poetry, with phrases such as “a spade is a spade”; phrases which within Australian politics are used deliberately to make politicians seem relatable and unpretentious. It also discusses the pressures of being visible as a ‘player’ on a stage, and the traits we perform in order to perform power. Given our ongoing interest in contemporary Australian politics, we felt the text offered a way to explore some of the ways representation of the self plays out in Australian politics, with a particular focus on the sexism faced by Julia Gillard as Prime Minister. This became the starting point for our video response.

 

More info and videos available at: https://insouliloquy.wordpress.com/

 
Snout In Souliloquy (after William Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream).
Written by

Tilly Lunken

Produced by

Victoria Pontillon and Tilly Lunken

Director

Alex Talamo

Performer

Dana McMillan

Sound

Tim Sneddon